Canada – Richard Ford

Read August 2015

The story of a boy, Dell, and his sister, whose lives are transformed when their parents, fairly desperate but highly unlikely criminals, rob a bank.
When they are caught, the mother arranges for them to be transported to Canada to live with the strange brother of her friend. Berner, the sister, runs away, leaving Dell to make the journey alone, where he experiences a strange, desolate and ultimately violent period of time. It appears that after this he establishes a normal if somewhat detached life, becoming a teacher and, possibly, writer. Berner’s life, from the little we see and hear of it from Dell, is more troubled and plagued by bad relationships and drink, and the book ends, fifty years or so after the initial incidents, with Dell visiting her as she dies.
Themes – the whole idea of America’s rural land as a place where people can invest, reinvent and hide their acts is a major theme, with Dell’s parents and Arthur Remlinger both thinking they can get away with robbery and murder by simply disappearing in to the large land of America and Canada.
We also see a lot about deception and the ways people hide their different natures and the ways they hide them from themselves.
And what is interesting is that Dell, despite all he has been through, is a fairly untroubled character. He is somewhat distances, detached, and on a quest to understand what happened but importantly, without digging too deep into how people think and feel. He wants thing to be surface level only, whilst knowing that they aren’t. It’s interesting to see, and have a story told through the voice of, a person who isn’t crazed or duplicitous but rather shows remarkable resilience in the face of a difficult and troubled upbringing. His voice throughout is one of simple and honest explanation, though still searching, indicating that people can and do live through terrible experiences and survive.
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